Effects of a Translational Community-Based Multimodal Exercise Program on Quality of Life and the Influence of Start Delay on Physical Function and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study.

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Effects of a Translational Community-Based Multimodal Exercise Program on Quality of Life and the Influence of Start Delay on Physical Function and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study.

Integr Cancer Ther. 2017 Sep 01;:1534735417731514

Authors: Foley MP, Hasson SM, Kendall E

Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was 2-fold: (1) to investigate the effects of a translational 12-week community-based multimodal exercise program on quality of life (QoL) in breast cancer survivors (BCS) and (2) to examine the influence of a start delay on physical function and QoL in BCS. Fifty-two female BCS completed a 12-week program consisting of 90-minute supervised exercise sessions at a frequency of 2 supervised sessions per week. Exercise sessions consisted of three 30-minute components: (1) aerobic conditioning, (2) resistance exercise training, and (3) balance and flexibility training. Significant ( P < .05) improvements in QoL were identified post-program completion. Cohort stratification comparison between the early start (<1 year since completion of oncologic treatment) and late start (>1 year since completion of oncologic treatment) revealed no significant ( P > .05) differences between the early start and late start groups on improvements in physical function. Regarding the influence of start delay on QoL, the early start group showed significant ( P < .05) improvement in emotional well-being. No other significant differences in improvement in QoL were detected between the early start and late start groups. Regardless of start delay, meaningful improvements in physical function and QoL were found after completing the community-based multimodal exercise program. Early participation in community-based exercise programming may benefit BCS' emotional well-being compared to later participation.

PMID: 28929821 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Current Usage of Traditional Chinese Medicine for Breast Cancer-A Narrative Approach to the Experiences of Women with Breast Cancer in Australia-A Pilot Study.

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Current Usage of Traditional Chinese Medicine for Breast Cancer-A Narrative Approach to the Experiences of Women with Breast Cancer in Australia-A Pilot Study.

Medicines (Basel). 2017 Apr 21;4(2):

Authors: Porter D, Cochrane S, Zhu X

Abstract
Background: The use of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) by breast cancer patients is growing. Few studies have examined the complexity of breast cancer survivors' attitudes, lived experiences, barriers, and perceptions in using TCM as part of their treatment journey. This article examines breast cancer survivors' experiences, perceptions of, and benefits (or not) in using TCM. Methods: Qualitative research, using semi-structured interviews, was the chosen methodology. Results: Participants used TCM as a form of self-help and as a complement, not an alternative, to standard care. Overall, 100% of the participants used acupuncture, 62% used Chinese herbal medicine, 23% used Qigong, and 23% used Chinese dietary therapy. Participants reported perceived outcomes and health benefits from TCM usage ranging from increased coping mechanisms, relieving stress and side-effects of standard treatment, the desire to be pro-active in the treatment journey, and to have a locus of control. Some cited the need to have "time-out" and the therapeutic relationship with the practitioner as being important. Conclusion: There is a clear need to understand breast cancer survivors' needs for physical and psychological support as they aim to regain control over their life through their experience of illness. More studies are needed to measure and evaluate these outcomes and to help identify breast cancer survivors' healthcare seeking behaviours, during and after the acute treatment stage that addresses their physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. These results aim to inform future research design and evaluate and develop support services that are patient-centred and focus on whole health outcomes, shared decision-making, and quality of life.

PMID: 28930235 [PubMed]

Palbociclib in hormone receptor positive advanced breast cancer: A cost-utility analysis.

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Palbociclib in hormone receptor positive advanced breast cancer: A cost-utility analysis.

Eur J Cancer. 2017 Sep 17;85:146-154

Authors: Raphael J, Helou J, Pritchard KI, Naimark DM

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The addition of palbociclib to letrozole improves progression-free survival in the first-line treatment of hormone receptor positive advanced breast cancer (ABC). This study assesses the cost-utility of palbociclib from the Canadian healthcare payer perspective.
METHODS: A probabilistic discrete event simulation (DES) model was developed and parameterised with data from the PALOMA 1 and 2 trials and other sources. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-month (QALM) gained for palbociclib was calculated. A time horizon of 15 years was used in the base case with costs and effectiveness discounted at 5% annually. Time-to- progression and time-to-death were derived from a Weibull and exponential distribution. Expected costs were based on Ontario fees and other sources. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to account for parameter uncertainty.
RESULTS: Compared to letrozole, the addition of palbociclib provided an additional 14.7 QALM at an incremental cost of $161,508. The resulting incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $10,999/QALM gained. Assuming a willingness-to-pay (WTP) of $4167/QALM, the probability of palbociclib to be cost-effective was 0%. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves derived from a probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that at a WTP of $11,000/QALM gained, the probability of palbociclib to be cost-effective was 50%.
CONCLUSION: The addition of palbociclib to letrozole is unlikely to be cost-effective for the treatment of ABC from a Canadian healthcare perspective with its current price. While ABC patients derive a meaningful clinical benefit from palbociclib, considerations should be given to increase the WTP threshold and reduce the drug pricing, to render this strategy more affordable.

PMID: 28930692 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]