Peptide SA12 inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 through G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest.

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Peptide SA12 inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 through G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest.

Onco Targets Ther. 2018;11:2409-2417

Authors: Yang L, Liu H, Long M, Wang X, Lin F, Gao Z, Zhang H

Abstract
Background: Targeted therapies have been proven as promising in the treatment of breast cancer and have improved survival and quality of life in advanced breast cancer. We previously identified a novel peptide SA12 which showed significant activity in the inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in SKBr-3 cells.
Methods: The present study investigated the potential antitumor role of SA12 in breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 through Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and colony formation assay, and examined the cell cycle distribution using flow cytometry analysis. Furthermore, the expression of cell cycle-related genes cyclin D1, CDK4, and tumor suppressor gene p16 were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot to explore the molecular mechanism.
Results: We determined that peptide SA12 suppressed the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell lines through the G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Moreover, the expressions of cell cycle-associated genes cyclin D1 and CDK4 were downregulated and the expression of tumor suppressor gene p16 was upregulated after treatment with SA12. MECP2 was required for the enhanced expression of p16 gene induced by SA12, which further inhibits CDK4/CDK6 activation and arrests the cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase.
Conclusion: We concluded that SA-12 inhibits the proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells through G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle related genes cyclin D1, CDK4, and p16 participate in the process, and MECP2 is essential for the enhanced expression of p16 gene induced by SA-12.

PMID: 29750041 [PubMed]

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The Effect of Uncertainty Management Program on Quality of Life Among Vietnamese Women at 3 Weeks Postmastectomy.

The Effect of Uncertainty Management Program on Quality of Life Among Vietnamese Women at 3 Weeks Postmastectomy.

Cancer Nurs. 2018 May 10;:

Authors: Ha XTN, Thanasilp S, Thato R

Abstract
BACKGROUND: In Vietnam, breast cancer is a top contributor to cancer-related deaths in women. Evidence shows that, after mastectomy, women in Vietnam have a lower quality of life than women in other countries. In addition, high uncertainty is a predictor of low quality of life postmastectomy. Therefore, if nurses can manage uncertainty, the quality of life postmastectomy can improve.
OBJECTIVE: This study examined the effect of the Uncertainty Management Program (UMP) on quality of life at 3 weeks postmastectomy in Vietnamese women.
METHODS: This research was a quasi-experimental study using a "posttest only with control group" design. There were 115 subjects assigned to either the experimental group (n = 57), who participated in the UMP and routine care, or the control group (n = 58), who received only routine care. Participants were assessed 2 times postmastectomy using the modified Quality of Life Index Scale-Vietnamese version.
RESULTS: The experimental group exhibited low uncertainty before discharge and significantly higher quality of life than the control group at 1 and 3 weeks postmastectomy, respectively (P < .05). Women's physical well-being, psychological well-being, body image concerns, and social concerns were significantly increased with UMP.
CONCLUSION: The UMP was considered as a promising program that might benefit the QoL of women with breast cancer 3 weeks postmastectomy.
IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The UMP appears feasible to apply for women with breast cancer to improve their QoL postmastectomy in various settings. Nurses can flexibility instruct women in their holistic care attention both in the hospital and at home.

PMID: 29746263 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Life quality of patients who underwent breast reconstruction after prophylactic mastectomy: systematic review.

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Life quality of patients who underwent breast reconstruction after prophylactic mastectomy: systematic review.

Breast Cancer. 2018 May 02;:

Authors: Aygin D, Cengiz H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Prophylactic mastectomy is used to reduce the incidence of breast cancer in women with genetic predisposition and family history of breast cancer, and the rate of application is increased nowadays. Chronic pain, body image, and sexuality may negatively affect quality of life, while patients generally have increased quality of life and satisfaction after prophylactic mastectomy. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the results of the studies about quality of life of patients who underwent breast reconstruction after prophylactic mastectomy.
METHODS: For the 1996-2016 literature, we searched the databases of Scopus, Science Direct, PubMed, EBSCO, Cochrane, Medline Complete, Ovid, Springer Link, Google Academic, Taylor & Francis, PsychINFO databases. For the gray literature, National Thesis Center and ULAKBIM databases were searched. Seven studies complying with the criteria were included in the review.
RESULTS: Seven studies included in this study aimed to investigate the effect of prophylactic mastectomy on breast pain, numbness, sexuality and quality of life. When the studies were reviewed, we were found that the majority of the patients were satisfied with the results of the procedure, although the body image perception and pain/ movement/ perception and sexual problems were experienced after the breast surgery.
CONCLUSIONS: While overall satisfaction with cosmetic results was high, most women were not satisfied with the softness of the reconstructed breasts, and had problems with breast hardness, numbness and sex. Therefore, it is very important to inform the patients about the complications that may develop after the operation, while there is not enough data about the importance of informing the patients before the operation.

PMID: 29721811 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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