Featured Topics

Comfort LivingTips of the day

  • Can menopause drugs lead to an increase in blood clot? Can menopause drugs lead to an increase in blood clot?


    Many women who are about to reach the menopause or have reached the menopause stage tend to use the estrogen therapy drug. This drug is used in the treatment of menopause. And this therapy is said to increase the risk of having blood clots. read more

    Loading...

    more>

News

Physical activity and sociodemographic variables related to global health, quality of life, and psychological factors in breast cancer survivors.

Related Articles

Physical activity and sociodemographic variables related to global health, quality of life, and psychological factors in breast cancer survivors.

Psychol Res Behav Manag. 2018;11:371-381

Authors: Patsou ED, Alexias GT, Anagnostopoulos FG, Karamouzis MV

Abstract
Background: Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting women worldwide and depression and anxiety are disturbing side effects of cancer diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of physical activity in global health, quality of life (QoL), and psychological factors (depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and anxiety) in breast cancer survivors after completing cancer treatment and through survivorship. Demographic variables (marital status, education, income), medical status (cancer stage), and level of physical activity (metabolic equivalent of task [MET]) were tested as predictors of depressive mood, anxiety, self-esteem, and QoL in younger and older breast cancer survivors.
Materials and methods: One hundred and seventy-one Greek breast cancer survivors, who had completed cancer treatment at least one and a half years ago, were included in this study. Demographic and medical information, self-reported and objective physical activity levels, global health, QoL, depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and anxiety were assessed in all participants.
Results: Active women had lower depressive symptoms, less anxiety, higher self-esteem, and better global health and QoL, compared to the inactive ones, even in the long term after completing treatment through survivorship. Exercise had significant positive correlations with self-esteem, global health, and QoL (physical, role, emotional, cognitive, and social aspects). Moreover, significant negative correlations with anxiety and depressive symptoms were found. Multiple regression analysis revealed that MET and covariates such as income, education, and stage of cancer were significant predictors of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, anxiety, global health, and QoL in younger survivors, while MET, income, education, stage of cancer, and marital status were significant predictors of dependent variables for the older ones.
Conclusion: It can be concluded that exercise should be recommended to cancer survivors even after treatment completion and through survivorship to achieve higher self-esteem, better QoL, and decreased anxiety and depressive symptoms.

PMID: 30233264 [PubMed]

Loading...

Effect of a Structured Yoga Program on Fatigue, Depression, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Quality of Life in a Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivor.

Related Articles

Effect of a Structured Yoga Program on Fatigue, Depression, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Quality of Life in a Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivor.

Int J Yoga. 2018 Sep-Dec;11(3):255-257

Authors: Dangi AA, Aurangabadkar SK, Deo MV

Abstract
A 52-year-old postmenopausal female diagnosed with duct carcinoma of the left breast underwent modified radical mastectomy 2 years ago. She had completed six cycles of chemotherapy postsurgery and complained of significant fatigue and depression. Her fatigue score on Piper Fatigue Scale was 4.1 and depression score on Beck's Depression Inventory was 22. She had a poor 6-min walking distance and a reduced quality of life. She was given a structured yoga program for 40 min five times a week for 4 weeks. Results showed a marked reduction in fatigue and depression scores and improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness. Her quality of life also showed improvement after the structured yoga therapy. This case report highlights the benefits of yoga for reducing fatigue, depression, and improving the cardiorespiratory fitness and overall quality of life in a breast cancer survivor.

PMID: 30233122 [PubMed]

Loading...

Home-Based Yoga Program for the Patients Suffering from Malignant Lymphoma during Chemotherapy: A Feasibility Study.

Related Articles

Home-Based Yoga Program for the Patients Suffering from Malignant Lymphoma during Chemotherapy: A Feasibility Study.

Int J Yoga. 2018 Sep-Dec;11(3):249-254

Authors: Kaur G, Prakash G, Malhotra P, Ghai S, Kaur S, Singh M, Kaur K

Abstract
Background: Yoga is proven beneficial in improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors receiving chemotherapy, but its effectiveness in lymphoma patients needs to be explored. As chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is very common among lymphoma patients, they are much prone to infections from the environment. Furthermore, trained yoga instructors are not available in every setting, so there is a need to develop home-based yoga program modules for lymphoma patients receiving chemotherapy.
Aim: The aim of the study was to explore the feasibility and safety of yogic exercises among lymphoma patients during chemotherapy.
Subjects and Methods: An interventional, single-arm prepost design study was conducted at a tertiary health-care center. Patients suffering from malignant lymphoma (18-65 years) with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status from 0 to 2, planned to receive chemotherapy were administered a home-based yoga program over a period of 2 months from the start of chemotherapy. The primary outcome variables were retention rate, acceptance rate, safety, and adherence. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL), fatigue level, overall sleep quality, depression, anxiety level, and pain were also assessed.
Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics was used to see the feasibility and adherence. The paired t-test was used to compare various pre and postintervention outcome measures.
Results: Fourteen patients (median age: 36 years, range13-65 years) of malignant lymphoma were enrolled in the study. Male-to-female ratio was 9:5. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients constituted 64%. The recruitment rate was 93%. Favorable retention (100%), acceptability (97%), adherence (78.6%), and no serious adverse events following yoga practice were reported. Improvement was also found in HRQOL, fatigue, sleep, depression, and anxiety. However, it needs further validation in a randomized study.
Conclusion: Home-based yoga program is safe and feasible among the patients suffering from malignant lymphoma receiving chemotherapy.

PMID: 30233121 [PubMed]

Loading...