Effects of a Translational Community-Based Multimodal Exercise Program on Quality of Life and the Influence of Start Delay on Physical Function and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study.

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Effects of a Translational Community-Based Multimodal Exercise Program on Quality of Life and the Influence of Start Delay on Physical Function and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study.

Integr Cancer Ther. 2017 Sep 01;:1534735417731514

Authors: Foley MP, Hasson SM, Kendall E

Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was 2-fold: (1) to investigate the effects of a translational 12-week community-based multimodal exercise program on quality of life (QoL) in breast cancer survivors (BCS) and (2) to examine the influence of a start delay on physical function and QoL in BCS. Fifty-two female BCS completed a 12-week program consisting of 90-minute supervised exercise sessions at a frequency of 2 supervised sessions per week. Exercise sessions consisted of three 30-minute components: (1) aerobic conditioning, (2) resistance exercise training, and (3) balance and flexibility training. Significant ( P < .05) improvements in QoL were identified post-program completion. Cohort stratification comparison between the early start (<1 year since completion of oncologic treatment) and late start (>1 year since completion of oncologic treatment) revealed no significant ( P > .05) differences between the early start and late start groups on improvements in physical function. Regarding the influence of start delay on QoL, the early start group showed significant ( P < .05) improvement in emotional well-being. No other significant differences in improvement in QoL were detected between the early start and late start groups. Regardless of start delay, meaningful improvements in physical function and QoL were found after completing the community-based multimodal exercise program. Early participation in community-based exercise programming may benefit BCS' emotional well-being compared to later participation.

PMID: 28929821 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]