Pre-treatment psychoneurological symptoms and their association with longitudinal cognitive function and quality of life in older breast cancer survivors.

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Pre-treatment psychoneurological symptoms and their association with longitudinal cognitive function and quality of life in older breast cancer survivors.

J Pain Symptom Manage. 2018 Nov 22;:

Authors: Tometich D, Small BJ, Carroll JE, Zhai W, Luta G, Zhou X, Kobayashi LC, Ahles T, Saykin AJ, Clapp JD, Jim HSL, Jacobsen PB, Hurria A, Graham D, McDonald BC, Denduluri N, Extermann M, Isaacs C, Dilawari A, Root J, Rini C, Mandelblatt JS, Thinking and Living with Cancer (TLC) Study

Abstract
CONTEXT: Symptoms affect quality of life (QOL), functional status, and cognitive function in cancer survivors, but older survivors are understudied.
OBJECTIVES: To identify prototypical pre-systemic therapy psychoneurological symptom clusters among older breast cancer survivors, and determine whether these symptom clusters predicted cognition and QOL over time.
METHODS: Women with newly diagnosed non-metastatic breast cancer (n=319) and matched non-cancer controls (n=347) aged 60+ completed questionnaires and neuropsychological tests before systemic therapy and 12- and 24-months later. Latent class analysis identified clusters of survivors based upon their pre-therapy depression, anxiety, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and pain. Linear mixed-effects models examined changes in objective cognition, perceived cognition, and functional status (instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) disability, functional well-being, and breast cancer-specific QOL) by group, controlling for covariates.
RESULTS: Nearly one-fifth of older survivors were classified as having a high pre-therapy symptoms (n=51; 16%); the remainder had a low symptoms (n=268; 84%); both groups improved over time on all outcomes. However, compared to the low symptom group and controls, survivors with high symptoms had lower baseline objective cognition and lower perceived cognition at baseline and 24-months, lower functional well-being at baseline and 12-months, greater IADL disability at baseline, and lower breast cancer-specific QOL at all time points (all p<0.05).
CONCLUSION: Nearly one-fifth of older breast cancer survivors had high psychoneurological symptoms at diagnosis, which, predict clinically meaningful decrements in perceived cognition and function in the first 24 months post-diagnosis. Pre-treatment psychoneurological symptom clusters could identify survivors for monitoring or intervention.

PMID: 30472317 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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